Volkswagen is displaying the potential of its flagship Golf R hatchback at the Auto China show in Beijing, in the muscular form of the Golf R 400 concept. If the ‘400’ in the name doesn’t give the game away that this is a seriously powerful machine, then the body and bumper modifications and flared wheelarches should give more than a hint.

Based on the standard Golf R hatchback, which with its turbocharged 300 PS engine and 4MOTION four-wheel drive is hardly a shrinking violet, the Golf R 400 ups the ante considerably, with 400 PS and an extra 70 Nm of torque, making for 450 Nm in total, available from 2,400 to 6,000 rpm. 

Developed by Volkswagen R GmbH, the arm responsible for high-power and customisation projects, the Golf R 400 uses a modified version of the engine found in the Golf R: a 2.0-litre four-cylinder turbocharged engine (Type EA888). The extra power of the 400 helps propel this six-speed DSG-equipped model from rest to 62 mph in just 3.9 seconds, a whole second faster than its 300 PS sibling. Its top speed is 174 mph (governed). 

To achieve the increase in power, the Golf R 400 features a newly developed turbocharger with a higher maximum charge pressure and reinforced crankcase. A water-cooled exhaust gas feed to the turbocharger integrated in the cylinder head helps to reduce full-load fuel consumption, while variable valve control with dual camshaft adjustment improves economy and performance.

At 1,420 kg, the Golf R 400 weighs the same as the standard Golf R, but its appearance has been substantially altered. The body is 20 mm wider on each side, with flared wheelarches that are reminiscent of those on the 1988 Rallye Golf G60. These arches, like most of the body, are painted in ‘Silver Flake’ metallic, and contrast with the gloss black roof and carbon door mirror caps. New sill extensions seamlessly bridge the gap between the widened arches.  Filling those arches are 19-inch alloy wheels on an increased offset. A development of the Golf R’s standard ‘Cadiz’ wheels, these are highly modified, with high-gloss back inserts that act as air vanes, helping to cool the reinforced braking system. The tyres are 235/35 R19s.

At the front, the bumper has been completely redesigned to take into account the greater cooling requirements of the R 400. A carbon fibre splitter and aerodynamic ‘wing element’ help to push air towards the honeycomb mesh of the grille – one of many aspects influenced by motorsport. The ‘R’ badge on the gloss black radiator grille sits on a ‘Lemon Yellow’ background, while the horizontal stripe across the grille (which, like the chrome strip on the Golf R, continues into the bi-xenon headlights) is also ‘Lemon Yellow’.

The redesigned rear bumper includes vents on each side, and the Golf R’s four tailpipes have been replaced with two centrally mounted items, like those on the 2002 Golf R32. These 110 mm diameter items are 200 mm apart, and point slightly upwards, displaying a honeycomb mesh. A black double spoiler with LED brake lights atop the tailgate finishes the look.

Inside are motorsport shell seats with integrated head restraints and belt openings. These are upholstered in cross-quilted panels covered in Alcantara, and ‘carbon leather’, as are the two individual rear seats. Stitching throughout the interior is in contrasting ‘Lemon Yellow’.

The Golf R 400 is only a concept at this stage, with no production plans.

Article source: www.volkswagen.co.uk

A camera at the back of your car shows you what's behind to make reversing safer and easier.

Or rear view camera lets you spot any obstacles behind your car - even moving ones - quickly and easily, thanks to the camera built into the boot.

The camera starts working as soon as you put your car into reverse gear. It shows the area behind your car on your radio or radio navigation system display offering you a clear reversing image with easy-to-follow guidelines. Superimposed graphic lines guide you to the optimal steering lock, guaranteeing fuss-free, smooth parking.

Using the rear view camera means you'll be able to manoeuvre quickly and easily, even into the most difficult parking space. It also alerts you to low-down obstacles which parking sensors cannot always detect. The reversing camera is also a great help when you're hitching up a trailer.

Article source: www.volkswagen.co.uk

The world’s most fuel-efficient hybrid car, the Volkswagen XL1, will go on display in the Design Museum in London alongside other examples of design excellence and Designs of the Year award nominees from a range of disciplines from today until 25 August.

Now in its seventh year, the Designs of the Year exhibition gathers together cutting-edge innovation and original talent, showcasing the very best in global Architecture, Digital, Fashion, Furniture, Graphic, Product and Transport design.

The Volkswagen XL1 features in the Transport category, and was nominated for the exhibition by author and automotive design and technology expert, Andrew Nahum, whose publications include ‘Fifty Cars That Changed The World’.  Designed by a team led by Klaus Bischoff, Head of Design for the Volkswagen brand, the XL1 is a limited series production two-seater car that explores the limits of energy efficiency for a road-legal production vehicle. 

The design brief for the XL1 was to produce a ‘one litre’ car – that is to say, a car that uses one litre of fuel per 100 km, equivalent to 282 miles per gallon.  The resulting vehicle uses just 0.9 litres per 100 km, or 313 mpg, and this high mpg figure correlates to a very low carbon dioxide emissions value of just 21 g/km. 

To achieve this fuel consumption figure, the XL1 was aerodynamically optimised, adopting the classic ‘tear drop’ shape and utilising innovations such as removing traditional wing mirrors and replacing them with small cameras called e-Mirrors which transmit exterior images to interior displays.  With a drag coefficient of 0.189 the XL1 can maintain 100 kmh on a level road in still air using just 8.4 PS. 

The super-innovative XL1 looks like a vision of the future, while its drivetrain melds a two-cylinder 48 PS 800 cc diesel engine with a 27 PS electric motor.  Power is served through a seven-speed triple clutch transmission.  Like any good supercar, it is also low (just 1,282 mm high) and features scissor-opening wing doors.  The XL1 is ‘handcrafted’ using small series production processes at Volkswagen’s Osnabrück factory in Germany.  For the required combination of lightness and strength, its body is made largely of carbon-fibre reinforced polymer.  Approximately 30 XL1 vehicles are expected to find homes in the UK.

The Designs of the Year exhibition at the Design Museum is a reflection of everything that is current and exciting in the world.  Alongside the Volkswagen XL1, it features, among other items, Kate Moss’s favourite app, a floating school in a Nigerian lagoon, friendly lamp posts and a mobile phone you can build yourself.  Exhibits come from a variety of sources including international design stars such as Zaha Hadid, David Chipperfield and Miuccia Prada, as well as crowd-funded start-ups and student projects.  

Visitors to the Design Museum will be able to pick their favourite design from the exhibition.  New for 2014 is the Social Vote which sees two nominations fight it out each day through the exhibition’s online platforms, and broadcast to over one million of the museum’s Twitter and Facebook followers. 

For more details on the XL1, please visit www.volkswagen.co.uk. To find out more about the Designs of the Year exhibition and to purchase tickets, go to www.designmuseum.org.

 
Article source: www.volkswagen.co.uk

The belt force limiter reduces the force of the seat belt above a certain threshold and, in conjunction with belt tensioners and airbags, lessens the risk of upper body injuries being caused to front passengers. In order to achieve this, a torsion bar in the belt retractor distorts under load. The system then releases the belt at a predefined force level. This reduces the maximum shoulder belt force and occupants are intercepted more gently by belt and airbag.

Article source: www.volkswagen.co.uk

The process of turbocharging increases temperature by compressing the fresh air in the turbocharger. As heated air takes up more space than cool air, the cylinders fill with less air than the system's boost pressure prescribes and the risk of knock in petrol engines also increases. For this reason, the compressed air is cooled by the engine's coolant or the outside air. The intercooler reduces the thermal load on the engine. At the same time, the exhaust-gas temperature, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and fuel consumption are reduced.

Article source: www.volkswagen.co.uk